Tag Archives: HSE Media Centre

HSE issues exemption for the manufacture and supply of biocidal hand sanitiser products in the UK

The Health and Safety Executive (HSE) has taken steps to support hand sanitiser manufacturers as UK production is increasing to tackle Coronavirus.

Due to unprecedented demand for biocidal hand sanitiser products during the coronavirus outbreak, HSE is providing derogations that will assist the UK manufacture and supply of biocidal hand-sanitiser products that use propanol as their active ingredients.

During the temporary exemption, biocidal hand sanitiser products containing Propan-2-ol will not be required to obtain a product authorisation if they meet the relevant WHO-specified formulation II.

Article 55 (1) of the Biocidal Products Regulation (BPR) enables HSE, in cases of danger to public health, animal health or the environment which cannot be contained by other means, to provide short term derogations from the requirements for product authorisation.

Manufacturers in scope of the derogation should read the advice provided in the link below.

Dr Richard Daniels, HSE’s Chemicals Regulation Director said: “It is vital that workers and members of the public are able to protect themselves and others from the spread of Coronavirus. The correct use of safe and effective biocidal hand sanitisers are part of the range of government measures to protect the NHS and UK citizens.

“Amid this national effort, we are working closely with other government agencies, manufacturers and their trade associations to help remove obstacles to the manufacture and supply of safe and effective biocidal hand sanitiser products and reduce supply chain issues.

“While this action will enable manufacturers to place hand sanitiser products on the UK market quickly, we still expect them to meet their responsibilities to adhere to the correct standards which protect the people and the environment from potentially harmful chemical effects.”

HSE’s updated guidance has been published on https://www.hse.gov.uk/news/hand-sanitiser-manufacture-supply-coronavirus.htm

 

 

Notes to editors

  1. The Health and Safety Executive (HSE) is Britain’s national regulator for workplace health and safety. We prevent work-related death, injury and ill health through regulatory actions that range from influencing behaviours across whole industry sectors through to targeted interventions on individual businesses. These activities are supported by globally recognised scientific expertise. www.hse.gov.uk
  2. More about the legislation referred to in this case can be found at: www.legislation.gov.uk/
  3. HSE news releases are available at http://press.hse.gov.uk
  4. Visit HSE Biocides website[5].

 

 

The post HSE issues exemption for the manufacture and supply of biocidal hand sanitiser products in the UK appeared first on HSE Media Centre.

from HSE Media Centre https://ift.tt/3ajvRER
via IFTTT

Tayside Health Board fined after three patients died in acute psychiatric ward

Tayside Health Board has been fined following three incidents where patients died by suicide using ligature points.

Perth Sheriff Court heard that, between 1 April 2012 and 4 November 2015, on the Moredun Ward at general adult psychiatry ward of Murray Royal Hospital, Muirhall Road, Perth, three patients were able to utilise ligature points to take their own lives. Patients on Moredun Ward are acutely unwell and often not in a position to ensure their own safety.

An investigation by the Health and Safety Executive (HSE) found that Tayside Health Board failed to assess, manage and control the risk of severe injury and death associated with ligature anchor points. Private bedrooms within the facility had multiple ligatures points which could have been removed to reduce the risk to patients on the ward. The Health Board failed to effectively communicate risks associated with the ligature points to staff who were required to monitor and assess patients. A previous attempt by one patient to secure a ligature to a ligature anchor point was not communicated to the staff who monitored her. She later successfully took her own life by the same method.

Tayside Health Board of Ninewells Hospital, Clepington Road, Dundee pleaded guilty to breaching Sections 3(1) and Section 33(1)(a) of the Health and Safety at Work Act and was fined £120,000.

After the hearing, HSE inspector, Kerry Cringan said: “These tragic incidents led to the avoidable deaths of three women. These deaths could have been prevented if the Health Board had acted to ensure their ward met the required standards for acute mental health facilities.  This requires providers to ensure that spaces where service users are not continually supervised are designed, constructed and furnished to make self-harm or ligature as difficult as possible. HSE will not hesitate to take appropriate enforcement action if providers fail to meet these standards.”

Notes to Editors:

  1. The Health and Safety Executive (HSE) is Britain’s national regulator for workplace health and safety. We prevent work-related death, injury and ill health through regulatory actions that range from influencing behaviours across whole industry sectors through to targeted interventions on individual businesses. These activities are supported by globally recognised scientific expertise. www.hse.gov.uk
  2. More about the legislation referred to in this case can be found at: www.legislation.gov.uk/
  3. HSE news releases are available at http://press.hse.gov.uk

The post Tayside Health Board fined after three patients died in acute psychiatric ward appeared first on HSE Media Centre.

from HSE Media Centre https://ift.tt/39lGLbM
via IFTTT

Poor management control puts workers at risk

A Blackburn logistics company has been fined after failing to provide fall protection for workers replacing the roof of its premises.

Blackpool Magistrates’ Court heard how, on 29 May 2019, Health and Safety Executive inspectors visited a warehouse in Blackburn and observed two workers on the roof without any physical protection or any work equipment in place to prevent or minimise the distance of a fall.

Further investigation by HSE also found that the roof of the warehouse was fragile and the employees were at risk of coming through it. The company, Speed Drop Logistics Ltd, did not have any measures in place to prevent workers falling from or through the roof from which they could suffer personal injury or even death. The removal of tiles should have been carried out from underneath the roof using a scissor lift or a cherry picker. Scaffold should have been in place to create a barrier against and to minimise the distance of a possible fall.

Speed Drop Logistics Ltd of Manner Sutton Street, Blackburn, pleaded guilty to breaching Regulation 6(3) of the Work at Height Regulations 2005. The company was fined £80,000 and ordered to pay costs of £1570.60.

Speaking after the hearing, HSE inspector Stuart Hadfield, said: “Falls from height remain one of the most common causes of work-related fatalities in this country and the risks associated with working at height are well known. Companies should be aware that HSE will not hesitate to take appropriate enforcement action against those that fall below the required standard.”

Notes to Editors:

    1. The Health and Safety Executive (HSE) is Britain’s national regulator for workplace health and safety. We prevent work-related death, injury and ill health through regulatory actions that range from influencing behaviours across whole industry sectors through to targeted interventions on individual businesses. These activities are supported by globally recognised scientific expertise. www.hse.gov.uk
    2. More about the legislation referred to in this case can be found at: www.legislation.gov.uk/
    3. HSE news releases are available at http://press.hse.gov.uk

 

The post Poor management control puts workers at risk appeared first on HSE Media Centre.

from HSE Media Centre https://ift.tt/2y0CNZ7
via IFTTT

Plymouth landlord receives suspended prison sentence after gas safety failings

A landlord from Plymouth has been sentenced after failing to maintain gas appliances and failing to have landlord’s gas safety checks undertaken at his rental property in Canterbury Drive, Plymouth.

Plymouth Crown Court heard how, in August 2018, a concern was raised with the Health and Safety Executive (HSE) by a previous tenant that no landlord’s gas safety checks had been carried out for three years. HSE made numerous attempts to contact the landlord, Mr Thomas Brumby, but received no replies or representations.

Having failed to provide HSE with a copy of any landlord’s gas safety records for his tenanted property, a formal Improvement Notice was served on Mr Brumby requiring him to arrange for the gas appliances at his tenanted property to be checked and maintained. Mr Brumby ignored this Improvement Notice.

Thomas Brumby of Canterbury Drive, Plymouth, pleaded guilty to breaching Regulations 36(3)(a) and 36(2)(a) of the Gas Safety (Installation and Use) Regulations 1998. He has been sentenced to 15 weeks in prison for each offence, both suspended for 18 months, and ordered to pay costs of £1,500.

Speaking after the hearing HSE inspector Simon Jones said: “Thomas Brumby put the residents and other members of the public at risk of harm by failing to maintain gas appliances in the domestic property. He showed contempt of the law surrounding gas safety at a tenanted property.

“Landlords must ensure they obtain a landlord’s gas safety record and they maintain all gas appliances in accordance with the law.”

 

 

Notes to Editors:

  1. The Health and Safety Executive (HSE) is Britain’s national regulator for workplace health and safety. We prevent work-related death, injury and ill health through regulatory actions that range from influencing behaviours across whole industry sectors through to targeted interventions on individual businesses. These activities are supported by globally recognised scientific expertise. www.hse.gov.uk
  2. More about the legislation referred to in this case can be found at: www.legislation.gov.uk/

HSE news releases are available at http://press.hse.gov.uk

The post Plymouth landlord receives suspended prison sentence after gas safety failings appeared first on HSE Media Centre.

from HSE Media Centre https://ift.tt/2wWhqYl
via IFTTT

Building firm fined after worker injured

Stan England Builders Limited has been fined following an incident when a worker suffered serious injuries after falling from a mezzanine level and wooden platform.

Aberdeen Sheriff Court heard that on 31 March 2016, Alan Ness was working at a residential property in Banchory. He began taping areas on the ceiling of a mazzine level. He gained access to this level by a wooden platform which had a ladder propped against it. As he was working close to the edge of the mezzanine level, he lost his footing and stumbled a drop of 18.5cm onto the wooden platform. He was unable to regain his footing and fell a further 2.5 metres head first onto the floor below. He sustained head, back and neck injuries.

An investigation by the Health and Safety Executive (HSE) found that there was no edge protection on the wooden platform and no safe system of work had been put in place. Mr Ness had received no formal training for work at height or working on ladders, he had a lack of knowledge and awareness of the hazards associated with work at height. Stan England Builders Limited had failed to supervise appropriately and had not corrected deficiencies, despite visiting shortly before the accident there was no written risk assessments for this task.

Stan England Builders Limited of Raemoir Road, Banchory pleaded guilty to breaching Regulation 6(3) of the Work at Height Regulations 2005 and was fined £6,000.

After the hearing, HSE inspector, Connor Gibson said: “Those in control of work have a responsibility to devise safe methods of working and to provide the necessary information, instruction and training to their workers in the safe system of working.

“Falls from height remain one of the most common causes of work-related fatalities in this country and the risks associated with working at height are well known. In this case a different and simple approach of using edge protection on the wooden platform could have prevented the life changing injuries sustained by the employee.”

 

 

Notes to Editors:

  1. The Health and Safety Executive (HSE) is Britain’s national regulator for workplace health and safety. We prevent work-related death, injury and ill health through regulatory actions that range from influencing behaviours across whole industry sectors through to targeted interventions on individual businesses. These activities are supported by globally recognised scientific expertise. www.hse.gov.uk
  2. More about the legislation referred to in this case can be found at: www.legislation.gov.uk/
  3. HSE news releases are available at http://press.hse.gov.uk

The post Building firm fined after worker injured appeared first on HSE Media Centre.

from HSE Media Centre https://ift.tt/38sYRrW
via IFTTT

Surrey metal fabricator fined after girl crushed by steel gate at primary school

A manufacturer of bespoke gates has been fined after an eight-year-old girl was crushed by a steel gate at a London school.

Westminster Magistrates’ Court heard that on 17 May 2018 the girl had been leaving an evening gymnastics club at the school in Streatham. when the sliding gate fell on her. She suffered multiple fractures to her pelvis as well as internal injuries.

The manual sliding gate, which is more than five metres long and 1.7 metres high, was designed and manufactured by Metalart Fabrication Limited. It was installed by Metalart at the school, which is attended by 1700 pupils, in February 2018 after a paper delivery lorry damaged a previous, two-leaf swing gate.

However, an investigation by the Health and Safety Executive (HSE) found that the mechanism in place to prevent the sliding gate from overrunning and falling over as it was opened (a small stop welded to its guiding rail) was insufficient if the gate was opened robustly.

When the gate was opened at the time of the incident, it became disengaged from the rollers holding it up, when its momentum caused it to ‘ride over’ the stop. With nothing to hold it in position, it fell on the girl. The company made changes to the gate’s stop mechanism on the morning after the incident and a HSE specialist verified its safety.

Metalart Fabrication Limited, of Oldfields Road, Sutton, Surrey pleaded guilty to breaching Section 6(1)(a) of the Health and Safety at Work etc Act 1974. The company was fined £19,327, including full costs of £1,147 and a victim surcharge of £180.

Speaking after the hearing, HSE inspector Sarah Whittle said: “The failure to fit suitable end-stops meant that the gate was an accident waiting to happen and could have fallen on anyone at any time with life threatening consequences.”

 

Notes to Editors:

  1. The Health and Safety Executive (HSE) is Britain’s national regulator for workplace health and safety. We prevent work-related death, injury and ill health through regulatory actions that range from influencing behaviours across whole industry sectors through to targeted interventions on individual businesses. These activities are supported by globally recognised scientific expertise. hse.gov.uk
  2. More about the legislation referred to in this case can be found at: legislation.gov.uk/
  3. HSE news releases are available at http://press.hse.gov.uk

 

 

The post Surrey metal fabricator fined after girl crushed by steel gate at primary school appeared first on HSE Media Centre.

from HSE Media Centre https://ift.tt/2POJALt
via IFTTT

Banksman crushed by a shovel loader on large waste and recycling site

A waste management company pleaded guilty to causing a life changing injury to one of its employees.

Folkestone Magistrates’ Court heard that, on 27 February 2017, an employee of Viridor Waste Management Limited was crushed by a reversing 22.5 tonne shovel loader driven by an on-site contractor at Viridor’s Crayford Materials Recycling Facility site in Crayford. The injured employee was working on foot in the area in his role as banksman, assisting a lorry to manoeuvre into a bay while a shovel loader reversed out of the bay independently, knocking him to the ground and driving over the lower half of his body. He suffered very serious internal injuries and multiple serious fractures, both with significant life changing effects.

An investigation by the Health and Safety Executive (HSE) found that Viridor Waste Management Limited failed to organise the workplace in such a way that pedestrians and vehicles could circulate in a safe manner. This prosecution is the fourth in 4 years for this company, two of which related to fatal incidents.

Viridor Waste Management Limited of Crayford Creek, Dartford, was found in breach of Regulation 4(1) of the Workplace (Health, Safety and Welfare) Regulations 1992 by virtue of Regulation 17(1). The company was fined £400,000.

Speaking after the case HSE inspector Megan Carr said “This incident is a reminder to the waste and recycling industry as to the importance of good workplace transport control which can often be achieved by simple pragmatic steps to avoid such incidents from occurring. HSE will not hesitate to take appropriate enforcement action against those that fall below the required standards.”

 

 

Notes to Editors:

  1. The Health and Safety Executive (HSE) is Britain’s national regulator for workplace health and safety. We prevent work-related death, injury and ill health through regulatory actions that range from influencing behaviours across whole industry sectors through to targeted interventions on individual businesses. These activities are supported by globally recognised scientific expertise. www.hse.gov.uk
  2. More about the legislation referred to in this case can be found at: www.legislation.gov.uk/
  3. HSE news releases are available at http://press.hse.gov.uk

Guidance on HSE’s website:   https://www.hse.gov.uk/pUbns/priced/hsg136.pdf

The post Banksman crushed by a shovel loader on large waste and recycling site appeared first on HSE Media Centre.

from HSE Media Centre https://ift.tt/32TMC6J
via IFTTT

Electricity power station company fined after contractors injured

An electricity power station company was prosecuted after three contractors were injured by a sudden release of water and sludge while carrying out maintenance work at a Cheshire power station.

Manchester Magistrates’ Court heard that, on 18 January 2018, three workers contracted by Keadby Generation Limited, were removing a recirculation pump for maintenance in the Flue Gas Desulphurisation area of Fiddlers Ferry Power Station in Warrington. Approximately 38.5 metres cubed of diluted slurry and associated stored energy was released while the pump was being removed, resulting in the contractors being knocked off the concrete plinth where they had been working. The trio sustained multiple fracture injuries.

An investigation by the Health and Safety Executive (HSE) found that the pressurised contents of the pump and associated pipework had not been discharged prior to work commencing due to the drain pipe being blocked. This resulted in the release of stored energy during the removal of the pump instead of during the isolation process. Keadby Generation Ltd had failed to undertake a suitable and sufficient assessment of the hazards and risks associated with the work and had not implemented a safe system of work.

Keadby Generation Limited, of Keadby Power Station, Trentside, Keadby, Scunthorpe, pleaded guilty to breaching sections 2(1) and 3(1) of the Health and Safety at Work etc. Act 1974 and was fined £200,000 with costs of £7163.20.

Speaking after the hearing, HSE inspector Jane Carroll said: “This incident could so easily have been avoided if the company had identified and managed the risks involved and put a safe system of work in place.

“Companies should be aware that HSE will not hesitate to take appropriate enforcement action against those that fall below the required standards.”

Notes to Editors:

  1. The Health and Safety Executive (HSE) is Britain’s national regulator for workplace health and safety. We prevent work-related death, injury and ill health through regulatory actions that range from influencing behaviours across whole industry sectors through to targeted interventions on individual businesses. These activities are supported by globally recognised scientific expertise. www.hse.gov.uk
  2. More about the legislation referred to in this case can be found at: www.legislation.gov.uk/
  3. HSE news releases are available at http://press.hse.gov.uk

The post Electricity power station company fined after contractors injured appeared first on HSE Media Centre.

from HSE Media Centre https://ift.tt/2PUy3L1
via IFTTT

Company fined after self-employed roofer falls from roof

Phoenix Roofing and Cladding Limited, a company specialising in roofing work, has been fined after a self-employed roofer was seriously injured when he fell from a roof.

Edinburgh Sheriff Court heard that, on 1 September 2016, a self-employed roofer was carrying out work for Phoenix Roofing and Cladding Limited, placing new roof panels and other materials on a roof at an industrial unit at the Butlerfield Industrial Estate, Newtongrange. Whilst traversing the roof, the roofer slipped and fell through an existing rooflight and landed on a suspended ceiling below.

An investigation by the Health and Safety Executive (HSE) found that the fall from height was possibly due to the unsafe working environment and unsafe methods of working being undertaken. It was established the main cause of the incident was insufficient identification of risk in the work being done.

Phoenix Roofing and Cladding Limited of Meeks Road, Falkirk pleaded guilty to breaching Section 3(1) of the Health and Safety at work etc Act 1974 and were fined £20,000.

Speaking after the hearing, HSE inspector Stuart Easson said: “Falls from height remain one of the most common causes of work-related fatalities in this country and the risks associated with working at height are well known.

“Companies should be aware that HSE will not hesitate to take appropriate enforcement action against those that fall below the required standard.”

Notes to Editors:

  1. The Health and Safety Executive (HSE) is Britain’s national regulator for workplace health and safety. We prevent work-related death, injury and ill health through regulatory actions that range from influencing behaviours across whole industry sectors through to targeted interventions on individual businesses. These activities are supported by globally recognised scientific expertise. www.hse.gov.uk
  2. More about the legislation referred to in this case can be found at: www.legislation.gov.uk/
  3. HSE news releases are available at http://press.hse.gov.uk

The post Company fined after self-employed roofer falls from roof appeared first on HSE Media Centre.

from HSE Media Centre https://ift.tt/2vkiCoh
via IFTTT

Paper-milling company fined after employee’s head was trapped in a machine

A paper-milling company has been fined after an employee suffered life changing injuries resulting in a nine-hour operation in hospital for facial reconstruction.

North Somerset Magistrates’ Court heard that, on 16 March 2017, an employee of De La Rue International Limited was helping colleagues to remove paper from the machine by standing in the gap between the size press and the after-dryer section of the machine in Bathford Paper Mill in Bathford, Bath. After a fixed guard was opened, the employee expected the spar drum to come towards him (clockwise), however, by the time he realised the cylinder was turning in the opposite direction (anti-clockwise), the spar drum had turned and his head became trapped between a spar and the base of the fixed guard.

An investigation by the Health and Safety Executive (HSE) found that De La Rue International Limited had not provided a safe system of work for the removal of broken paper from the after-dryer section of the paper-making machine when the machinery was operated in reverse.

De La Rue International Limited of Bathford, Bath pleaded guilty to breaching Section 2 (1) of the Health and Safety at Work etc. Act 1974. The company has been fined £300,000 and ordered to pay costs of £11,191.70.

Speaking after the hearing, HSE inspector Tania Nickson said: “Those in control of work have a responsibility to devise safe methods of working and to provide the necessary information, instruction and training to their workers in the safe system of working.

“If a suitable safe system of work had been in place prior to the incident, the life changing injuries sustained by the employee could have been prevented.”

Notes to Editors:

  1. The Health and Safety Executive (HSE) is Britain’s national regulator for workplace health and safety. We prevent work-related death, injury and ill health through regulatory actions that range from influencing behaviours across whole industry sectors through to targeted interventions on individual businesses. These activities are supported by globally recognised scientific expertise. hse.gov.uk
  2. More about the legislation referred to in this case can be found at www.legislation.gov.uk/
  3. HSE news releases are available at http://press.hse.gov.uk
  4. Further information about safe techniques can be found at: www.hse.gov.uk/pubns/books/hsg279.htm

The post Paper-milling company fined after employee’s head was trapped in a machine appeared first on HSE Media Centre.

from HSE Media Centre https://ift.tt/385jkDa
via IFTTT