Should construction workers hurt in falls be liable if they’re to blame? Law says no, Johnson says yes. – silive.com

not related

CITY HALL — As part of his work to reform the Metropolitan Transportation Authority (MTA), City Council Speaker Corey Johnson is targeting New York’s Scaffold Law, which some say significantly boosts the insurance costs for transportation projects.

The law — enacted in 1885 — holds employers responsible for ensuring that safety equipment is properly deployed for those working at dangerous heights, and fully liable if an employee is injured from a related fall.

via Should construction workers hurt in falls be liable if they’re to blame? Law says no, Johnson says yes. – silive.com.

Prosecution Details | Offender Perth Aluminium Scaffolds Pty Ltd (ACN 009 133 591)

Both the accused’s director and the painter saw the victim disappear through the roof as he walked leaving the platform section sitting over the skylight.

The other two scaffolders and the leading hand heard something and turned around to see that the victim had disappeared through a hole in the roof and the platform was sitting over the skylight.

The VenuesWest Catering Supervisor was inside the stadium below on a mezzanine floor when she saw the victim fall through the roof and through a void area to the concourse level below. She ran to the guardrail and looked down before phoning for an ambulance. VenuesWest Reception was alerted by other witnesses sitting in the nearby café and also called for an ambulance.

The Casual Events Setup Worker was standing on the concourse level below the skylight void when he heard a loud crack and saw the victim falling from above and landing on the concrete concourse floor approximately fifteen metres from where he was standing.

He ran to the victim to help.

via Prosecution Details | Prosecutions Database | Department of Commerce.

LOcHER – @locherproject

Learning Occupational Health by Experiencing Risks (LOcHER)

What is LOcHER?

An approach for students and apprentices to identify health and safety risks in their area of study; learn about them and showcase how they can protect their health and safety; and take that experience into the world of work.

It is designed to deliver risk control experience throughout the curriculum.

Employers can use the project approach to engage workers in a more engaging way than the traditional “slide and screen”, booklets and handout methods.

Why LOcHER?

  • A proven method of learning, retaining, and recalling new information
  • Interesting, engaging, safe and practical
  • Helps students develop valuable employment and life skills
  • Contributes to a College’s 5Rs – Recruitment, Retention, Results, Recognition, and Rewards

via LOcHER.

Lessons from recent industrial disasters – 1) Safety inspectors are lax or go easy on owners| The Daily Star

The costs of industrialisation are many. Human beings, wildlife, nature, the environment, and future generations often pay the price. In some instances, those who shoulder the burden do so voluntarily; some are compensated for their sacrifice and, in most cases, the suffering is imposed without their knowledge and consent. Add to that the tons of catastrophic events such as industrial accidents, mine collapses, and transport disasters that are a regular news item in this day and age. Ironically, many of these were foreseen and the deaths and illnesses could have been prevented.

Victims of industrial accidents are sometimes paid compensation although these are often small quantities of money and frequently do not reach the victims on time. Fortunately, we now have the capability to identify the culprits and are constantly refining the mechanism to measure the cost of the pain, suffering and physical damage they generate.

A review of these disasters has identified three problems:

1) Safety inspectors are lax or go easy on owners;

2) Companies hire inspectors from “friendly” agencies; and

3) Companies ignore inspection reports or disregard early warning signs. 

via Lessons from recent industrial disasters | The Daily Star.

Photo by Hans Ripa on Unsplash