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HSE issues exemption for the manufacture and supply of biocidal hand sanitiser products in the UK

The Health and Safety Executive (HSE) has taken steps to support hand sanitiser manufacturers as UK production is increasing to tackle Coronavirus.

Due to unprecedented demand for biocidal hand sanitiser products during the coronavirus outbreak, HSE is providing derogations that will assist the UK manufacture and supply of biocidal hand-sanitiser products that use propanol as their active ingredients.

During the temporary exemption, biocidal hand sanitiser products containing Propan-2-ol will not be required to obtain a product authorisation if they meet the relevant WHO-specified formulation II.

Article 55 (1) of the Biocidal Products Regulation (BPR) enables HSE, in cases of danger to public health, animal health or the environment which cannot be contained by other means, to provide short term derogations from the requirements for product authorisation.

Manufacturers in scope of the derogation should read the advice provided in the link below.

Dr Richard Daniels, HSE’s Chemicals Regulation Director said: “It is vital that workers and members of the public are able to protect themselves and others from the spread of Coronavirus. The correct use of safe and effective biocidal hand sanitisers are part of the range of government measures to protect the NHS and UK citizens.

“Amid this national effort, we are working closely with other government agencies, manufacturers and their trade associations to help remove obstacles to the manufacture and supply of safe and effective biocidal hand sanitiser products and reduce supply chain issues.

“While this action will enable manufacturers to place hand sanitiser products on the UK market quickly, we still expect them to meet their responsibilities to adhere to the correct standards which protect the people and the environment from potentially harmful chemical effects.”

HSE’s updated guidance has been published on https://www.hse.gov.uk/news/hand-sanitiser-manufacture-supply-coronavirus.htm

 

 

Notes to editors

  1. The Health and Safety Executive (HSE) is Britain’s national regulator for workplace health and safety. We prevent work-related death, injury and ill health through regulatory actions that range from influencing behaviours across whole industry sectors through to targeted interventions on individual businesses. These activities are supported by globally recognised scientific expertise. www.hse.gov.uk
  2. More about the legislation referred to in this case can be found at: www.legislation.gov.uk/
  3. HSE news releases are available at http://press.hse.gov.uk
  4. Visit HSE Biocides website[5].

 

 

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Air pollution goes down as Europe takes hard measures to combat coronavirus

The European Environment Agency’s (EEA) data confirm large decreases in air pollutant concentrations — of nitrogen dioxide (NO2) concentrations in particular — largely due to reduced traffic and other activities, especially in major cities under lockdown measures. Reductions of around half have been seen in some locations. The EEA’s data are measured hourly, on the ground, at about 3,000 monitoring stations across European countries.

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Tayside Health Board fined after three patients died in acute psychiatric ward

Tayside Health Board has been fined following three incidents where patients died by suicide using ligature points.

Perth Sheriff Court heard that, between 1 April 2012 and 4 November 2015, on the Moredun Ward at general adult psychiatry ward of Murray Royal Hospital, Muirhall Road, Perth, three patients were able to utilise ligature points to take their own lives. Patients on Moredun Ward are acutely unwell and often not in a position to ensure their own safety.

An investigation by the Health and Safety Executive (HSE) found that Tayside Health Board failed to assess, manage and control the risk of severe injury and death associated with ligature anchor points. Private bedrooms within the facility had multiple ligatures points which could have been removed to reduce the risk to patients on the ward. The Health Board failed to effectively communicate risks associated with the ligature points to staff who were required to monitor and assess patients. A previous attempt by one patient to secure a ligature to a ligature anchor point was not communicated to the staff who monitored her. She later successfully took her own life by the same method.

Tayside Health Board of Ninewells Hospital, Clepington Road, Dundee pleaded guilty to breaching Sections 3(1) and Section 33(1)(a) of the Health and Safety at Work Act and was fined £120,000.

After the hearing, HSE inspector, Kerry Cringan said: “These tragic incidents led to the avoidable deaths of three women. These deaths could have been prevented if the Health Board had acted to ensure their ward met the required standards for acute mental health facilities.  This requires providers to ensure that spaces where service users are not continually supervised are designed, constructed and furnished to make self-harm or ligature as difficult as possible. HSE will not hesitate to take appropriate enforcement action if providers fail to meet these standards.”

Notes to Editors:

  1. The Health and Safety Executive (HSE) is Britain’s national regulator for workplace health and safety. We prevent work-related death, injury and ill health through regulatory actions that range from influencing behaviours across whole industry sectors through to targeted interventions on individual businesses. These activities are supported by globally recognised scientific expertise. www.hse.gov.uk
  2. More about the legislation referred to in this case can be found at: www.legislation.gov.uk/
  3. HSE news releases are available at http://press.hse.gov.uk

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Poor management control puts workers at risk

A Blackburn logistics company has been fined after failing to provide fall protection for workers replacing the roof of its premises.

Blackpool Magistrates’ Court heard how, on 29 May 2019, Health and Safety Executive inspectors visited a warehouse in Blackburn and observed two workers on the roof without any physical protection or any work equipment in place to prevent or minimise the distance of a fall.

Further investigation by HSE also found that the roof of the warehouse was fragile and the employees were at risk of coming through it. The company, Speed Drop Logistics Ltd, did not have any measures in place to prevent workers falling from or through the roof from which they could suffer personal injury or even death. The removal of tiles should have been carried out from underneath the roof using a scissor lift or a cherry picker. Scaffold should have been in place to create a barrier against and to minimise the distance of a possible fall.

Speed Drop Logistics Ltd of Manner Sutton Street, Blackburn, pleaded guilty to breaching Regulation 6(3) of the Work at Height Regulations 2005. The company was fined £80,000 and ordered to pay costs of £1570.60.

Speaking after the hearing, HSE inspector Stuart Hadfield, said: “Falls from height remain one of the most common causes of work-related fatalities in this country and the risks associated with working at height are well known. Companies should be aware that HSE will not hesitate to take appropriate enforcement action against those that fall below the required standard.”

Notes to Editors:

    1. The Health and Safety Executive (HSE) is Britain’s national regulator for workplace health and safety. We prevent work-related death, injury and ill health through regulatory actions that range from influencing behaviours across whole industry sectors through to targeted interventions on individual businesses. These activities are supported by globally recognised scientific expertise. www.hse.gov.uk
    2. More about the legislation referred to in this case can be found at: www.legislation.gov.uk/
    3. HSE news releases are available at http://press.hse.gov.uk

 

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Lincolnshire hotel with dangerous electrics fined £220,000 for serious health and safety failures – Lincolnshire Live

The owners of Stoke Rochford Hall Hotel have been fined a total of £220,000 after admitting a string of serious health and safety offences.

South Kesteven District Council first took action after a food hygiene inspector visited in May 2017 and discovered a damaged electrical cable across a walkway on the kitchen floor and exposed cables in the dish washing area.

The operator Stoke Rochford Hall 1, formerly Talash No.6 Ltd, repeatedly failed to cooperate with improvement notice and the council was left with no choice but to take the firm to court

via Lincolnshire hotel with dangerous electrics fined £220,000 for serious health and safety failures – Lincolnshire Live.